Library

 

Oversized folio book of navigation charts printed for East-India Company

Came with a custom box designed to protect it onboard the ship. Initials carved on the interior of the box “C.H.R.” belong to Capt. Charles H. Rollins (1824-1896), shipmaster and captain from Portsmouth N.H. Name written in ink on the exterior of the box “Mich. Hooker” refers to Michael Hooker (d. 1831), ship captain of Portsmouth, N.H. and ancestor of Capt. Rollins.

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An early copy of the catalog of books in the Portsmouth Athenaeum

The Portsmouth Athenaeum was a subscription library founded in 1817.

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An early copy of the Acts and Laws of N.H.

Owned by John Waldron of Dover, N.H. in 1772, with a handwritten list of his children and their birth dates.

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17th Century Navigation Textbook

Paper practice “navigation instruments” still intact and functional.

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Book of Psalms

This well used copy of the book of Psalms is presented in both English and the Massachuset language of the Algonquins. Experience Mayhew translated this edition into the Massachuset dialect from John Eliot’s 1640 version in the Natick dialect.

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History of the Pirates of the West Indies

This second edition, the first edition published in Dutch, is a dramatic history of the pirates of the West Indies. This work has served as the basis for countless novels, stories, and dramas, as well as establishing the popular legends of many famous pirates. Sir Henry Morgan actually sued the author (a pirate himself) for defamation and was awarded £200 for damages.

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Early N.H. childrens book published in Portsmouth

Bound with covers made from an early wallpaper. It is signed in a childs’ handwriting “Don Oliver.”

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Introduction

The Athenæum reflects the broad range of interests of educated nineteenth century Portsmouth citizens, including science and technology, history and exploration, theology, biography, navigation and maritime history, law, and arts and architecture. The personal libraries of two men, Benjamin Tredick (1802-77) and Charles Levi Woodbury (1820-98), are maintained intact in special alcoves in the third floor Library Room and several other early bequests of rare books are preserved in the collection. The library continues to acquire both new and old books in a wide variety of subjects of interest to its members. A special emphasis is made on collecting Portsmouth imprints and works relevant to the study of the region’s history.

The Athenæum houses an outstanding collection of documents and artifacts relating to local history. It also preserves what is undoubtedly the finest collection in the state of materials relating to the history of New Hampshire’s only major seaport. The Sawtelle Reading Room serves as a gallery to display highlights of the maritime collection, including paintings of local ships, a series of portraits of ship captains, merchants, and naval officers, and the gilt figurehead from the schooner Alcea. A jewel of the collection is the plank-on-frame model of the ship America, built in Portsmouth for the Royal Navy in 1749. It is the oldest surviving model of an American-built ship. The Athenæum displays more than forty half-hull builder’s models of Piscataqua-built vessels, and the oldest surviving measured drawing of an American ship, the Elizabeth , launched from a tributary of the Piscataqua in 1752.

Of even greater importance than the impressive visual collections are the superb archival collections. These include the Customs House records for the port of Portsmouth during the American Revolution and the extraordinarily detailed records of the New Hampshire Fire & Marine Insurance Company, which insured hundreds of voyages during its twenty years of operation between 1803 and 1823. In all, the library holds approximately 400 lineal feet of archival materials and more than 8,000 historic photographs documenting the early history of the port city. These materials along with the 40,000 volume library are open and available to researchers and the general public free of charge three days per week. The historic Sawtelle Reading Room is open free of charge for tours one day per week, and the Athenæum’s Randall Gallery, which hosts three exhibitions every year on themes of local art and history, is open at no cost three days per week. Nearly all of the Athenæum’s historical, literary, musical, and scientific programs are offered to the general public free of charge.

A Brief Guide to the Reference Library

The following is a list of selective resources available to researchers of families and their history in the reference room of the Portsmouth Athenaeum.  Subject or vertical files: they are organized by location. See INDEX in blue folder on top of the fall file cabinets. The vertical files are located in two grey file cabinets. You may copy articles as long as they are re-filed in the same folder, keeping the same order

  1. Name files: a) Family files are organized alphabetically and located in the tall file cabinets. These files contain genealogical information, as well as other materials pertaining to various Seacoast area families. The list is not comprehensive. b) Street files were researched and organized by the Portsmouth Advocates. They are located in the low file cabinets and are organized alphabetically according to street name. They contain images and basic information on houses in Portsmouth, including the Historic District. Some files have extensive information pertaining to the history and occupants of significant buildings.
  2. City Directories 1821 to present: located in the Portsmouth section (middle stack of shelves). The city directories contain alphabetical lists of streets and family names. The head of households are listed, usually with profession or place of work, as well as the residence. Also listed in the directories are holders of town offices. Advertisements in the back of the directories can yield useful and interesting information. NOTE: Portsmouth street numbers changed between 1912 and 1914. The directory for 1914 contains both the old and the new street number.
  3. Church and Cemetery Records: Portsmouth’s major churches are the Congregational North Church, the South or Unitarian Church, and the Episcopal or St. John’s Church (known as Queen’s Chapel till the 1790’s). For these we have incomplete records of births, marriages and deaths. There are locators for the South Cemetery plots. South Cemetery includes four sections: Cotton (1721), Proprietors’ (1830), Harmony Grove (1847) and Sagamore (1871). Other existing historic cemeteries are 1) Graves’ End, 2) Pleasant Street, and 3) North Cemetery. In all of these you will find the tombstone inscriptions of certain Portsmouth family members.
  4. Maps: The Athenaeum has an index to maps in its collection. Most useful for the general researcher is the 1813, 1839, 1850, and 1877 maps of the city displayed in the research library. We also have the 1910 and 1920 Sanborn Insurance maps available. They are located on the horizontal file cabinet next to the tall file cabinets. NOTE: Buildings first appear on local maps after 1801.
  5. Electronic card catalog: The card catalog is available online at portsmouthathenaeum.org as well as in the research library itself. It lists all available books and pamphlets in the library. It is indexed by subject matter, author and title. The Athenaeum subscribes to a number of general periodicals and topical journals. These are stored in the stacks on the fourth floor. A list of materials in stacks is posted. Ask for assistance from library staff.
  6. Manuscript Index: The Portsmouth Athenaeum has 76 manuscript collections, and over 700 single item and small collections. Most of these are available for research. The finding aids are available on line as well, together with a subject index and a box list of items.
  7. Photo Index: The Portsmouth Athenaeum has a large collection of photographs, postcards, cabinet cards, stereographs, slides and negatives. Use the on line catalog to find your topic and note that the collections are organized from P1 to P25, followed by PS and the separate collection of the Isles of Shoals.
  8. Dictionaries: In the research library there are general dictionaries such as American Biographies, the Dictionary of American Art, and many more.
  9. Genealogy: Index and contents of the New England Historical and Genealogical Society are available on CD-Rom. Family genealogies are shelved together alphabetically in a separate section in the research library. Town histories are shelved in alphabetical order by state.
  10. Customs Records: A transcript of Portsmouth customs records is available in a 5-volume set, shelved on a cabinet at the end of the stacks.
  11. Newspapers: A list of newspapers is located near the lower file cabinets. We have newspapers on microfilm, and some original copies of the New Hampshire Gazette and other Portsmouth papers.
  12. Town, State and Regional Histories: A collection of town histories from New Hampshire and Southern Maine, covering the entire Piscataqua region, is available on the shelves of the research library.
  13. Micromedia and Multimedia: There is a collection of CD-ROMs, including records of the New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Civil War records, Revolutionary War roll, Evans’ Abstracts of New Hampshire Probate Records.
Book Collections in the Portsmouth Athenaeum Library By Richard M. Candee

Painted signs that once hung above the library bookcases help us understand the earliest subject organization of the Athenæum collections. “Periodicals, Science, Arts” were shelved together, as were “Irish, Scottish, English, French” histories. Two signs reflect belle lettres: “The Drama, Poetry, Classics” occupied one set of shelves, “Novels, Tales & Romances” another. In May 1853 Norton’s Literary Gazette described Portsmouth’s Athenæum as quite full of English and American history. “It has also a fine collection of Voyages and Travels, and of works of Natural History, besides many valuable works on Architecture and Ship Building.” With the Athenæum’s relatively high rate of book retention, this is still a fairly accurate summary of the nineteenth-century core library and makes the Athenæum book collections an important document of Portsmouth reading habits. Read More

Tomorrow, Market Square Day returns to downtown Portsmouth!🎈🥳🎉🙌

With the street closures, the Athenaeum will be closed tomorrow, but we will celebrate in history! We always do!😉

Here's the cover of the Guide to Market Square Day in 1986 when it was a three-day event. In 1978, MSD began as a celebration following the revitalization of Market Square by the City of Portsmouth and members of the community, transforming the downtown center into a more pedestrian-friendly and welcoming destination. From our perch in the Square, we see and hear so much activity every day. What a success!!🎵🥰🏆

We sampled some audio from @johnbreneman3 of the Market Square Day 10k back in 2017. John has a great article on the history of Market Square Day on his website tripleactionnews.com.

John writes, "The inaugural celebration marked a major milestone in Portsmouth’s nearly 400-year history — the dramatic transformation of an economically depressed downtown, bisected by a five-lane asphalt wasteland, into the vibrant, brick-lined public plaza that today is the centerpiece of a thriving community of cuisine, culture and commerce."💥❤🎈

Each year, Market Square Day is the result of all the hard work of @pro_portsmouth and many others in the community. Thank you!

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And finally, thank you all who donated this week to the Armsden Project campaign on @nhgives. We reached over 80% of our fundraising goal to purchase archival supplies for the Armsden photograph collection. We need more balloons! Here's even more good news. The nhgives.org website will stay active until midnight tonight. We need $415 more, and you can carry us over the top! Helium-free.🎈 Link in bio.

#MarketSquareDay #ephemera #nhgives #collectpreserveshare📖 #localhistory #PortsmouthNH #nh #Maine #Seacoast❤
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Today brings the Year of the Tiger in the Lunar New Year. 🐅 🎊🧧

In the archives, we found this tiger lurking on a poster for a Theatre by the Sea production of two one-act plays by Murray Schisgal: "The Typists" and "The Tiger."🎭

This performance was the Ceres Street theatre's first touring production, held at the Paine Auditorium at the University of New Hampshire in Durham during late January 1966.

David Mayberry of UNH's "The New Hampshire" newspaper offered a review of the performance describing it as "a success in every way but at the box office--only 30 people attended." He continued, "It is a tragedy that so many culturally minded people (as I'm sure there are in Durham) passed up this opportunity to see good theater."

Mayberry provided an intriguing summary of each production. The Typists included two unusual office workers: "Sylvia Payton, the dumb, primping secretary, of course a spinster, greets the new man, Paul Cunningham, a handsome, gum chewing, night law student, who is working his way through school. The beginning sounds trite, but the dialogue picks up and the small office talk takes on philosophic overtones."

The Tiger was about the aftermath of an abduction. "It's not as bad as it sounds," Mayberry wrote. "The abductor, Ben, a frustrated pseudo-intellectual and a tiger at heart, is tamed by the abducted, Gloria, the wife of a nine-to-five business man."🤔

Mayberry lamented the actor who portrayed Ben could have had more tiger energy. "A little more ferocity at the beginning and a little more meekness at the end" could have added depth.🐾

He concluded, "Lighting, although not superb, was tolerable. Make-up was no problem. Costumes and sets were cleverly used. Both plays were well done. The main criticism is that more people did not see them. How can we expect outside groups like Theatre by the Sea to continue bringing such fine productions to Durham if they are so poorly attended?"

Ok, we're interested. To the time machine! Who else is coming?🎟🙋‍♂️🙋‍♀️

[Gift of Hovey Dodge, E 2516]

#yearofthetiger #lunarnewyear #theatrebythesea #unh #durhamnh #ephemera #collectpreserveshare📖 #localhistory #PortsmouthNH #nh #Maine #Seacoast❤
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The Portsmouth Athenaeum wishes you and yours a Merry Christmas and a joyous holiday season.🎄

Here is a circa 1890s Christmas card compliments of the Frank Jones Brewing Company of Portsmouth, NH, and Boston, MA. The brew yard was located off Islington Street, and at one point, it was the largest producer of ale in the United States.

Born in Barrington, NH, Frank Jones (1832-1902) came to Portsmouth at 17 to peddle pots, pans and tinware from a wagon. Within a decade, he had bought out a local brewer and was on his way to becoming "King of the Alemakers."

At its peak, the Frank Jones Brewery in Portsmouth employed over 500 people and produced 250,000 barrels per year. Jones built hotels, started water companies, owned the largest shoe factory in the world in the 1880s, and he was president of the Boston & Maine Railroad. In 1868 and 1869, he was elected mayor of Portsmouth, and from 1875 to 1879, he served in Congress.

Jones owned a 1,000-acre farm off Maplewood Avenue called Maplewood Farm. The mansion still stands as apartments, and the extensive land has been incorporated into neighborhoods, the highway system, and even parts of Pease Development Authority. Interestingly enough, Jones lived most of his time in Portsmouth at the Rockingham, his hotel on State Street.

[Ephemera Collection, E 1840]

The song "O, Tannenbaum" ("Oh Christmas Tree" in English) was recorded by the Nebe Quartet in Berlin, Germany, in 1905. The song comes from The Cylinder Archive (www.cylinder.de) and Free Music Archive (freemusicarchive.org).

#merrychristmas #happyholidays #frankjonesbrewery #islingtonstreet #otannenbaum #ephemera #collectpreserveshare📖
#localhistory #PortsmouthNH
#NH #Maine #Seacoast❤
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Hear ye! Hear ye! Tonight is the annual tree lighting followed by the illuminated holiday parade in Portsmouth. Who's going?🙋‍♂️🙋‍♀️🕯🎄🎵🥰

This trade card advertised J. H. Hutchinson, fine jewelry and silverware at 10 Market Square in Portsmouth, c. 1880s.💎

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John Holt Hutchinson (1838-1897) was born in Nelson, NH, and was living in St. Johnsbury, VT, where he married his wife, Mary Emma Graham (1840-1908). They had two children. John served in the Civil War as a lieutenant in the Third Vermont Infantry.

By March 1968, he was in Portsmouth in a partnership with A. D. Rowell to purchase the jewerly store of Charles T. Emery. A year later, Hutchinson bought out Rowell. He employed James R. Connell and formed a partnership with him from 1873 to 1876.

After John died, his daughter Mattie Noyes Hutchinson (1863-1929) ran the jewelry store. Two years after her mother's death, Maddie moved to Boston.

The family lived on Lincoln Avenue, and they are buried in Proprietors Burying Ground.

For a time, the business was next door to the Athenaeum and right behind the tree with front row seats to tonight's festivities. Today, @saultnewengland is located there.

#marketsquare #tradecards #jhhutchinson #jewelers #ephemera #collectpreserveshare📖 #localhistory #PortsmouthNH #nh #Maine #Seacoast❤
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